Advertisement
  TheJournal.ie uses cookies. By continuing to browse this site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Click here to find out more »
Dublin: 16 °C Wednesday 23 August, 2017

'The rigid way our social welfare system works means we are losing good care workers'

Carers receive wages barely above the minimum wage, little guarantee of hours and have precious little career advancement prospects, writes Michael Harty.

Dublin/Monaghan bombings: 'We need to know extent of British state involvement with this loyalist gang'

The Irish government must ensure that the British government abides by its obligations on legacy issues, writes Seán Crowe TD.

Homeschooling: 'We wanted our children to take responsibility and not to be dependent on us and teachers'

We want what any parent wants for their child, that they grow up to be happy, confident and capable adults, writes Cora McCauley.

'A fire ended my Leaving Cert hopes. I've taken a longer, scenic route to success'

My repeat Leaving Cert was a struggle – and my early attempts to get a job were farcical. 20 years on, now I’m in a position to help others, writes Seònaid Ó Murchadha.

Bitcoin's future: 'Remember many people saw the early internet as a toy that would never take off'

Some of the most talented software developers in the world are working on Bitcoin, writes John Gleeson.

'We need an Irish centre, liberal but conscious of valid concerns regarding immigration and security'

The current dichotomy is not pleasing anyone. There is a need for a new party to offer a palatable option C, writes Ethan Shattock.

'We sold my wedding ring to afford six months' rent. We are now faced with bankruptcy'

We lost our home but our story is not unique and we are far from alone, writes Carly Bailey.

Gardening: Grow your own tomatoes - from seed to sauce

If you had a variety of tomato that was a particular success this year, why not try saving the seeds from the tomatoes to grow next year’s plants, writes Michael Kelly.

Charlottesville statue: 'Many monuments to British figures were destroyed or removed in Ireland too'

The blowing up of Nelson’s pillar, on O’Connell Street, in 1966 is the most acute example of the re-writing of the Irish landscape, writes Dr Richard Scriven.

Opinion: 'Genuine personal injury claimants should not be penalised by new regulations'

The government is proposing changes to personal injury claims, and while that may benefit insurance companies, they may not pass on the savings to consumers, writes John McCarthy.

Opinion: 'These bigots are not representative of 60 million citizens who voted for Trump'

Saying that the average Trump voter is a racist amounts to a slur on those (including several of my own close friends) who voted for him for a variety of reasons, writes Larry Donnelly.

'The government have put their funding into mental health campaigns rather than services'

If we’re going to ask people to talk up, then we must have people to listen, writes Una Power.

Opinion: 'Sorry, UN. Ireland's abortion laws are progressive, modern and compassionate'

In pushing for abortion the UN is seriously undermining its human rights mission, writes Niamh Uí Bhriain.

'We are teaching too many students to do jobs that our society doesn’t need'

We create too many graduates who are destined to drain from society rather than contribute to it, writes Chris Fitzgerald.

Caring for Mam: 'Putting myself first is not an option even though I have the most to lose'

I am functioning through a crisis, writes Emma Hayes.

Gen Z: 'A generation that believes in their individual ability to change the world'

These are the leaders and innovators of the future and I, for one, feel in safe hands, writes Rachel Collier.

'It's important the government made it look like it was letting people 'have their say''

Australia could learn from the Irish experience, writes Dr Brian Tobin.

Column: 'Diverse Finsbury is an example of how things could be in the world'

The violence of the Finsbury Park attack belies the truth of an area that is in fact, a cultural melting pot, a picture of diversity at its finest, writes Stephen Mullan.

GIY: Make your own mildew spray and bake some courgette bread

Courgette bread might sound a little unlikely, but we’re in courgette glut central at the moment so desperate times call for desperate measures, writes Michael Kelly.

'I won't defend Danny Healy-Rae's politics but I will defend personal belief in fairies'

There’s not a village in the country that doesn’t have these fairy stories, writes Michael Fortune.

Tom Clonan: 'I've had enough. We need a campaign for our brothers and sisters disabled by our State'

Is Leo Varadkar – Taoiseach for those who “get up early in the morning” – prepared to vindicate the rights of early risers like my son, asks Tom Clonan.

RTÉ pay: 'Those who say that we need to pay a lot to attract talent are wrong'

We know that many journalists working in the private media make peanuts, writes Julien Mercille.

Ireland's undocumented migrants: 'Our flat was broken into. We couldn't report it to the gardaí'

Ireland’s undocumented migrant workers are calling on the Irish government to regularise their status.

'As the only independent woman in cabinet I am determined this will not be a once off'

I am ready for the negotiations ahead and have already made clear that the increases secured for childcare in Budget 2017 must at the very least be matched, writes Minister Katherine Zappone.

Column: 'I hate mental health being used in the media as an explanation for crime'

Psychosis is a distressing difficulty in which thoughts and emotions make it hard to determine what is reality and what is not. #StillJustMe is an anti-stigma campaign launched in 2017 by St Patrick’s Mental Health Services.

Column: 'In practice, how much help is the Help to Buy for first-time buyers?'

It depends largely on your personal circumstances. But if you are thinking of applying for this scheme then you would be wise to assess your eligibility and your options ASAP, writes Barry Flanagan.

Alice Mary Higgins: 'Budget 2018 must be gender and equality proofed'

Statistics show that Ireland has one of the highest levels of income inequality in the OECD before redistribution through tax and social transfers, writes Senator Alice Mary Higgins.

Alcohol addiction: 'How could I explain to my friends that our house was different?'

Addiction is not just suffered by those going through it. It is also suffered by those who see their family members or loved ones going through it. #StillJustMe is an anti-stigma campaign launched in 2017 by St Patrick’s Mental Health Services.

'The North must be designated special status in order for the whole island to stay in the EU together'

‘While Britain is driving head first into the train wreck that is Brexit, it cannot be allowed to drag our agreements, progress and prosperity with them’, writes David Cullinane.

'When my dad was let go, I remember thinking I never want to be in that situation'

Seeing his father lose his job inspired Keith Moran to one day set up his own business.

'It wasn’t hard to decide to run away. FGM was just like death because of the bleeding'

ActionAid is launching a new international strategy, based on supporting people-led efforts to end poverty, injustice and gender inequality, writes CEO Siobhán McGee.

SPONSORED

'Irish blasphemy laws are a mild inconvenience. In other parts of the world, they're a matter of life or death'

As Vice-President responsible for the European Parliament’s dialogue with churches, religions and non-confessional organisations, I am increasingly being called upon to work on the crucial issue of freedom of religion or belief, writes Mairead McGuinness.

Country living: 'We'll always be blow-ins but our sons are locals, and root us here'

Moving to a small village in the heart of the Irish countryside was the beginning of a new life for Philip Judge.

Grow it yourself: 'Onions - a phenomenally useful veg'

Onions have been revered through time, not only for their culinary use, but also for their therapeutic properties, writes Michael Kelly.

HSE system fault: 'We don't need a witch hunt now'

We must learn the lessons of this, but we must also keep moving forward, writes Niall Ó Tuathail.

'Our reproductive health laws have come to the attention of the UN Torture Committee'

Ireland’s abortion laws are cruel, inhuman, degrading and discriminatory, writes Niall Behan.

Senator Neale Richmond: 'Ireland should ask for a second Brexit referendum'

It would be a risky move but it could focus the minds of the UK government to take the negotiations a bit more seriously, writes Senator Neale Richmond.

'Move RTÉ outside Dublin and fund it through the sale of the Donnybrook studio'

Moving RTÉ to rural Ireland would create an opportunity to change its funding mechanism away from traditional advertising and the TV licence, writes Marc MacSharry.

Johnny Healy Rae: 'Kerry farmers work for €2 to €3 an hour with no pension scheme or social welfare'

I own a small farm at the bottom of Mangerton Mountain. It’s far from the land in the Curragh but I wouldn’t give it away for all the gold in China, writes Johnny Healy Rae.

'We should follow Norway and publish everyone’s tax returns online'

If you happen to have a Norwegian national ID number, you can see my tax returns from when I lived and worked in Oslo between 2013 and 2016, writes Aengus Ó Maoláin.

1 2 3 4 5